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steps

1-step:  This is the most common type of hair coloring.  When done on virgin hair that will not be lightened more than 3-4 shades, it provides gentle lightening without bleach.  When darkening, changing tones and/or covering grey, it can be done in just 1-step.  Examples include: natural highlights, retouch for grey coverage,  all-over color the same lightness with the same or darker tone.

2-step: De-colors previously colored hair when a lighter shade or extreme brightness is desired or in any instance when more than 4 shades of lightening is desired.  After de-coloring, an additional color, or toner, is applied to obtain the final hue.  This is commonly done with a highlighting technique, but can be done all-over as a way of lightening previously colored hair.

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techniques

all-over color

retouch:  Colors the roots only on previously colored hair when a similar shade, darker or lighter (up to 3 shades) is desired. First-time clients should book a full color to obtain best results.  A simple 10-minute blow dry is included.  (If your hair is very frizzy or if flat ironing or curling iron is needed, it should be scheduled separately, immediately after the color service, by going to the “style & blow dry” on the top toolbar.

full color:  Colors the roots & ends when a similar shade, darker or lighter (up to 3 shades) is desired. A simple 10-minute blow dry is included.  (If the blow dry is on quite frizzy hair or if flat ironing or curling iron is needed, it should be scheduled separately, immediately after the color service).

block-coloring:  Utilizing precise sectioning patterns, a unique “layered” color result is possible.  Commonly incorporating triangular shaped sections, though any shape could be used, combined with cutting some sort of layers into the hair will yield best results.

high-lights

partial: Highlights (lighter) or low lights (darker) the front hairline and top head areas. It is normally all that is needed for a natural looking highlighted effect. If you going 4 or more shades lighter, a (two-step) partial highlight must be scheduled.

full:  Full head highlight, generally done when a very light shade is desired on the entire head.  If you going 4 or more shades lighter, a (two-step) partial highlight must be scheduled.

low-light:  Low-lights are just highlights done darker than the rest of the hair.  Normally done in combination with a partial or full highlight.  Though this cannot be scheduled online, it can be added on to any highlight appointment.

balayage/hair painting:  Balayage is a French coloring technique developed in the 1970s.  A freehand technique applied directly on the hair rather than using foil to segment the hair being colored, that’s best on hair at least shoulder length, but can be done on short hair as well.

under-lights: a technique developed in house, so don’t ask other salons about it.  It involves careful color placement to understate the highlights creating various textured results, excellent technique to eliminate the need to “touch up” the color.

ombre:  In fashion, the term ombre refers to the graduation of color in textile. Similarly in the hair industry, this graduation of color, also refers to lighter tones at the ends of the hair, much like natural “surfer” type highlights.  More extreme color combinations are possible when using a 2-step ombre technique.


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types of hair color

permanent: lighten up to 4 shades, darken, opaque grey coverage and/or change tone on “virgin” hair.

demi-glaze:  lighten up to 1 shade, darken damaged hair, translucent grey coverage and/or change tone on virgin or pre-colored hair.  This ammonia-free acid hair color can be used as toner in a 2-step technique.

semi-glaze:  darken very damaged hair, especially pre-bleached hair.  Large color molecules lodge into damaged cuticle layers better than permanent color.  Normally only used as a toner in a 2-step technique on extremely compromised hair.

bleach: (this is not a dirty word),  also called de-colorizer. Bleach can only lighten hair and not deposit color, therefore it is almost always followed with a toner as part 1 of a 2-step technique, since it is the only way to adjust tone when bleach is used.  Bleaching can be done with an all-over technique or as highlights.  When the desired shade is 5 or more shades lighter, bleach is the only way to achieve such extreme lightness. Today’s bleach is much gentler and better performing than in years past.